By in Sci Fi & Paranormal

short story review: "Father's Vampire" by Alvin Taylor and Len J. Moffatt

The narrator begins by telling the reader that Father is a little mad and someday he shall have to put him away, too, but for the moment he’s harmless. Father has always collected things, even when the family was poor. Now that they’re wealthy, he just collects more things.

One of the conditions of remaining wealthy—because it was an inheritance from Uncle Henry that made them wealthy, there were conditions—was that they had to give Aunt Mabel a place to stay.

Father welcomed her by telling her, “I always disliked you less than I did Uncle Henry, Mabel.”

The narrator offered her her choice of his pet rats—excepting the pregnant one. He wanted the offspring for his laboratory work.

Aunt Mabel didn’t seem any happier with the arrangement than they did. At least it didn’t last long. She was found dead one morning with pinpricks in her neck. The doctor ruled it murder.

After a suspect is arrested, tried and found guilty, it’s time for a little father and son heart-to-heart…

This is a cute little story which turns a lot of things on their ear. The romantic vampire is actually pretty boring. The books Father collects, he doesn’t actually read, but his son does. Added in are a couple of sly side jokes that make this quite the amusing little story. Despite its age, this could whip sparkly vampires with one fang impacted.

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Title: “Father’s Vampire” first published in Weird Tales May 1952

Author: Alvin Taylor and Len J. Moffatt (1923-2010)

Source: ISFDB

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Yesterday’s review: “The Temple” by H. P. Lovecraft

Last creepy crawly review: “Familiar Face” by Robert M. Price

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© 2015 Denise Longrie


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Comments

msiduri wrote on August 13, 2015, 10:20 AM

&VisionsofHope How I missed this comment until now, I don't know. Humor in horror/ghost stories is enjoyable, particularly when it's unexpected. The horror still present in this one, but that he makes a fool of the vampire is entertaining.