By in Gardening

You Can't Keep a Good Crocus Down

Here in the South, when the tiny little crocus blooms first poke their heads up out of the ground some time in February, it can only mean one thing.

It's time to snow.

There's Indian summer, and blackberry winter. February is crocus winter.

There may not have been a Snow Jam 2015 to rival last year's storm, but in north of and south of the mountains, any accumulation of six or more snowflakes that stick is a mega event. While I didn't get the two or three inches I was hoping for on Wednesday, I did get enough snow to put my poor little crocuses through the wringer.

Photo (c) 2015 Debbi Craton. May not be used without permission. All rights reserved.

Here are the crocuses on Tuesday morning after the first wintry mix fell overnight.

Photo (c) 2015 Debbi Craton. May not be used without permission. All rights reserved.

By Wednesday morning, I was pretty sure the had all been killed. If they hadn't been, they surely would by the "absolute certainty" of 1 to 7 inches (later revised to 2-6 inches) of snow that was practically guaranteed by Atlanta forecasters to fall starting Wednesday afternoon. (Roll eyes here if you're from the South.)

Photo (c) 2015 Debbi Craton. May not be used without permission. All rights reserved.

I did get some nice snow showers with big , beautiful flakes Wednesday afternoon (Guiness the Cat did not like them), but the temps never dropped as low as they said. After the initial dusting, I mostly got rain and sleet and all my plans for snow ice cream were a bust.

Photo (c) 2015 Debbi Craton. May not be used without permission. All rights reserved.

When I went out Friday morning, the crocuses were all laid out and I was sure they were going to die. I hadn't counted on their resiliency, however.

Photo (c) 2015 Debbi Craton. May not be used without permission. All rights reserved.

What a difference a few hours and a few degrees can make! By Friday afternoon, most of the blooms had fully recovered. You'd never know they had been subjected to snow and ice twice within 48 hours.

***

(c) 2015 by Debbi Craton. May not be used without permission. All rights reserved.


Image Credit » Photo (c) 2015 Debbi Craton. May not be used without permission. All rights reserved.

You will need an account to comment - feel free to register or login.

Comments

cmoneyspinner wrote on February 28, 2015, 9:00 PM

Very lovely photographs. So much enjoyed this post. Thanks for sharing.

GayleStorm wrote on February 28, 2015, 9:10 PM

You captured some wonderful shots of their snow adventure.

wolfgirl569 wrote on February 28, 2015, 10:20 PM

Love the look of the ice on them. Almost like they are in a cocoon waiting to come out.

BarbRad wrote on February 28, 2015, 11:27 PM

I've never grown a crocus. Do they need cold winters to bloom? Your photos are lovely. I tweeted this one out with the last photo.

Hollyhocks100 wrote on March 1, 2015, 4:40 AM

It´s just amazing what plants can survive. Lovely photo´s emoticon :smile:

WordChazer wrote on March 1, 2015, 7:08 AM

Those crocii are obviously tougher than Guiness the wusspuss! We have daffodils in our front patch at the moment, currently being blown to all corners of the nearest three counties by the gale that's passing through.

Last Edited: March 1, 2015, 7:09 AM

Kasman wrote on March 1, 2015, 8:16 AM

Crocuses in the UK are also in bloom. I have a small display in my garden and they are looking lovely.

LindaCPearson wrote on March 1, 2015, 1:54 PM

I'm jealous. If there are any attempts of a crocus blooming in my neck of the woods in Connecticut, they are buried under almost three feet of snow. As it's just starting to snow again here, a storm predicted for this afternoon into tomorrow am, I don't think I'll be seeing anything close to a crocus any time soon!

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 1, 2015, 10:55 PM

They did come out ... and then promptly flopped. But they rebounded amazingly.

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 1, 2015, 10:59 PM

YOU are asking ME about how to grow flowers??? Really, Barb, you should know better than that. I didn't plant them (my dad did years ago), and I don't do anything to them. They have to be hardy--they survive in spite of me! I think they do need some cold, though, from things I just looked up. They always bloom extremely early, and usually it works out that we have a cold snap just as they come up. An image search produced a lot of pictures of them blooming in snow. I wonder if that has anything to do with why I have so many more than usual this year?

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 1, 2015, 11:00 PM

They survive ME, so they must be hardy!

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 1, 2015, 11:02 PM

My daffodils are up, but they haven't bloomed yet, which is good, because they would never have come back the way the crocuses did.

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 1, 2015, 11:03 PM

This is Guiness the Cat. I'll be right over to take pictures.

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 1, 2015, 11:07 PM

I don't imagine they would bloom in Connecticut in February, LOL! I do wish you wouldn't be such a hog with all that snow. Share a little with the rest of us sometime, okay? I wanted snow ice cream, but I would have had to scrape every snowflake off the entire yard to fill a small bowl.

celticeagle wrote on March 2, 2015, 2:59 PM

My daughter brought in a lovely yellow crocus yesterday. Butter yellow.

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 2, 2015, 5:09 PM

I bet it was pretty.

LilyDay wrote on March 3, 2015, 12:03 AM

They are lovely flowers.

Poor Guiness! He does not look the least bit happy about such "terrible" winter weather.

HappyLady wrote on March 3, 2015, 2:32 AM

Those flowers are very pretty and Human 1 says it is how she feels about snowdrops here, but I side with Guineas about the snow flakes. Love from Freya, the Catblog Cat.

trufflehunter wrote on March 3, 2015, 4:15 AM

I wonder how snow ice-cream tastes. Is that Guiness the Cat? Thanks for your earlier comment, Guiness!

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 3, 2015, 3:59 PM

He wasn't. He walked to the corner of the porch, looked at the yard, then turned around and came right back to the door.

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 3, 2015, 4:00 PM

Dear Freya the Catblog Cat,

You are a smart kitty.

Sincerely, Guiness the Handsome

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 3, 2015, 4:03 PM

Snow ice cream is nothing but snow, milk, vanilla flavoring, and sugar, and it is very good! Although last year, I was out of white sugar, so I used brown sugar. That was good, too. But it takes at least an inch or two of good clean snow to gather enough without getting trash or dirt in it, and I didn't have near that amount. Sometimes we don't see that much snow for several years.

LilyDay wrote on March 3, 2015, 7:52 PM

Is he still claiming that "his" Outside has somehow been broken? emoticon :smile:

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 4, 2015, 1:25 AM

This is Guiness the Cat. It isn't broken as bad as last year, but it's still in sorry repair. Today it's all soggy, but at least it's not cold.

LilyDay wrote on March 4, 2015, 5:48 AM

Guiness, it is good that it is not as broken as last year. You would not like our winters here in the least. We get temperatures that Queen Kitty terms "whisker freezing cold"--and that is just from the chill air that makes it in when we open the door!

Fortunately, I think that we may not see much more of the really bitter cold now... at least, not bitterly cold by local standards.

crowntower wrote on March 13, 2015, 4:37 AM

I guess everything has its own life span here on earth that automatically ended at the exact time God has ended it. Hhehehe. but fortunatley we can still grow other plants while the people we love can grow each day with us in our hearts. (But I think all those people who passed away that is in heaven now are all happy, and happy to see us, because they know we are heading to the right path that we should choose for victory... ok back to plants! Lol!) God bless.

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on March 13, 2015, 11:11 AM

That's a good analogy.

Kath wrote on April 9, 2015, 7:39 AM

So colourful, and so fleeting. And these ones you describe, resilient. We had some appear under a pine tree each year. Always just for a few days and all the more appreciated because of that.

OldRoadsOnceTraveled wrote on April 9, 2015, 1:39 PM

It seemed my crocuses bloomed more beautifully, longer, and more proficiently this year despite the bad weather than I remember them doing before. They were amazing.